Latest Comic : Friday, November 27. 2020

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Server upgraded to macOS Big Sur

iMac stuck on Setting Up Account step of the macOS Big Sur upgrade

I skipped upgrading the iMac serverโ€™s OS to macOS 10.15 Catalina last year mainly due to the removal of 32-bit application support. After a year, the clean-up of obsolete apps was complete, paving the way for the upgrade.

During the preparation, there was a bit of a hiccup with the MySQL database, But putting the data to a new one largely solved the issue and the website ended up loading much quicker. Two minor errors occurred after moving to the new database, which were quickly resolved by editing the configuration file:

1. "Query failed: Out of sort memory, consider increasing server sort buffer size"

Solution: increase sort_buffer_size from the default of 262144
sort_buffer_size=2097152

2. "Query failed: Expression #1 of SELECT list is not in GROUP BY clause and contains nonaggregated column 'blog.multilingual_body.value' which is not functionally dependent on columns in GROUP BY clause; this is incompatible with sql_mode=only_full_group_by"

Solution: remove only_full_group_by in sql_mode
sql_mode=STRICT_TRANS_TABLES, NO_ZERO_IN_DATE, NO_ZERO_DATE, ERROR_FOR_DIVISION_BY_ZERO, NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION

With all the pieces ready I went with the installation of macOS 11.0 Big Sur. It took about an hour and except for a prolonged setup time of the iCloud, things went smoothly.

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Illuminated ISS crossing waning Moon

Brightly lit ISS passes in front of the Moon on November 11, 2020 (click for full resolution)

The International Space Station is usually in the Earth's shadow when it makes a pass in front of the Moon. But when the conditions are just right, you can see both illuminated by the Sun just like the photo I took above. When seen with the naked eyes, it looked as if a bright meteor was darting across the sky towards the Moon and eventually pass right through it. To witness this, I drove about 40km northeast to the edge of Damyang in the early morning.

Device: Nikon P1000
Settings: 3000mm - ISO 400 - 1/500s - f/8
Filters: None
Time: 2020-11-11 05:36:43 KST
Location: Damyang, Korea
6 photos processed with RegiStax 6.1.0.8 and Pixelmator Pro 1.8
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Appearance on SBS "What on Earth" episode #1104


[Source page at SBS website]

The weekly SBS TV program "What on Earth" (์ˆœ๊ฐ„ํฌ์ฐฉ ์„ธ์ƒ์— ์ด๋Ÿฐ์ผ์ด) is one of the longest-running show on the network, going back to 1998. I made an appearance on episode #187 on Feburary 28, 2002 as the "computer man" that wore the "wearable computer" around the city. The show has recently been going back to the archives to highlight the notable old episodes and they wanted to show how I was doing these days. The newspaper article from 10 years ago made the cut, but not more recent stuff, probably due to time constraint. Still, it was a good opportunity to let people know I'm still out there, alive and well.

P.S. There are now a couple of news articles on my appearance online.

2020-10-16 Update: SBS Noriter and another news outlet have reported as well.

Close approach of Mars in 2020

Mars seen in 5-minute intervals at around midnight of October 9, 2020 during its close approach

With the red planet coming close again after two years, it gave me another good opportunity to take a detailed look of the surface using my equipment. The Nikon P1000 has been working well for me these days, so I pointed its lens to the sky around midnight to capture the photos. Although the total session lasted less than an hour, I got satisfactory results.

Last time the Mars was close, I photographed the eastern hemisphere. This time I got to see the western hemisphere, which has the famous features like Olympus Mons and Valles Marineris, one of the biggest examples of mountain and canyon in the solar system, respectively. Also, I got to see the polar ice caps on Planum Australe for the first time, a highlight of the otherwise reddish, 45-pixel wide (22.6" apparent) disc of the planet.

Device: Nikon P1000
Settings: 3000mm - ISO 100 - 1/500s - f/8
Filters: None
Time: 2020-10-09 00:18 - 00:54 KST
Location: Naju, Korea
44 photos processed with PIPP 2.5.9, RegiStax 6.1.0.8, and Pixelmator Pro 1.8
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Adding data display to Bolt EV with UltraGauge MX

UltraGauge MX (bottom center) shows various info next to the iOS 14 CarPlay screen (right)

To keep a detailed log of the Bolt EV's battery status, I've been using a Bluetooth OBD-II adapter that connects to a smartphone for the past two years. While it worked well, I wanted to have a permanent display showing the data and installing an iPhone to do so seemed to be an overkill. So I searched for dedicated "gauge" units that allowed for customization and narrowed the selection down to ScanGauge 2 and UltraGauge MX. The former allowed for more custom data (25 PIDs vs. 8), while the latter had a bigger screen (8 lines vs. 2). I ended up with the bigger screen.

With the device at hand, I had to find a way to program it to display Bolt EV-specific data using the existing custom PID information, and then install it on a place where it is both easily visible and properly shaded. After a bit of work, I was able to fulfill all of the objectives, as you can see in the photo above. The first page shows the actual vehicle speed, accelerator pedal position, various battery information including State of Charge (both raw and displayed), usable capacity, and temperature, as well as current trip distance and 12V battery voltage. Let's see how this was done.
First boot-up of UltraGauge MX

Initially, UltraGauge detects how many of the 60 standard OBD-II PIDs (Parameter Identifications) and 28 self-calculated data it supports are available on the car. Because Bolt EV does not have an internal combustion engine, most of these are irrelevant and unsurprisingly unsupported. Of the 20 said to be usable as shown here, only 7 of them are standard PIDs and none are related to monitoring the high-voltage propulsion battery.
PID # Description Unit
010D Vehicle speed km/h
0121 Distance driven with CEL (Check Engine Light) on km
0130 Warm-ups since TC (Trouble Code) was cleared Count
0131 Distance driven since TC was cleared km
0142 ECM (Engine Control Module) 12V Battery Voltage V
0146 Ambient Air Temperature ยฐC
0149 Accelerator Pedal Position 1 %
So I had to devote all of the eight custom PID slots available for this purpose. The problem is that the screen for configuring them (MENU - Gauge/Page Menu - Select Gauge/Page - M Gauge Setup) looks like this:
MGauge programming screen for slot 1

And it's not easy to make sense of it at first. I needed to translate the information found in an unofficial list of custom PIDs for Bolt EV into this format. After reading the UltraGauge MX programming supplement and researching the CAN Bus protocol, I was able to do just that. For these PIDs...
PID # Description Unit Formula
228334 State of Charge (Displayed) % A × 100 / 255 + 0
015B State of Charge (Raw) % A × 100 / 255 + 0
2241A3 Battery Capacity (for 2017-18 Bolt) kWh A × 999 / 31250 + 0
22434F Battery Temperature ยฐC A × 1 / 1 - 40
22436B HV Charger Voltage V A × 1 / 2 + 0
22436C HV Charger Current A A × 1 / 20 + 0
22437D Last Charge Amount kWh A × 1 / 100 + 0
2241B6 Battery Heater Power kW A × 1 / 1000 + 0
I programmed UltraGauge like this:
# Abbr1 Abbr2 TData TCtrl RCtrl RPos Mtch X / + Out Ave L/R
1 SoC D % 07E4228334 93 31 2008 628334 0064 00FF 0000 00 00 32
2 SoC R % 07E0015B 92 21 1808 415B 0064 00FF 0000 00 00 32
3 Cap kWh 07E42241A3 93 31 2010 6241A3 03E7 7A12 0000 00 00 22
4 Bat ยฐC 07E422434F 93 31 2008 62434F 0001 0001 FFD8 00 00 30
5 Chg hvV 07E422436B 93 31 2010 62436B 0001 0002 0000 00 00 32
6 Chg hvA 07E422436C 93 31 2010 62436C 0001 0014 0000 00 00 32
7 Chg kWh 07E422437D 93 31 2010 62437D 0001 0064 0000 00 00 22
8 BHt kW 07E42241B6 93 31 2010 6241B6 0001 03E8 0000 00 00 13
You can see that TData is composed of the header and the PID. The header specifies which ECM the data should be coming from and there are at least eight of them (E0 to E7) on Bolt. The numbers used in the formula are entered in hexadecimal, as with other inputs. After making sure that the programmed PIDs were working as intended, I went ahead with the permanent installation of the device.
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