Latest Comic : Thursday, December 5. 2019

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Making external storage work on iPhones with iOS 13

- or, why do I get "too much power" error with my drive and how do I fix it? -

Apple's official Lightning to USB Camera Adapter

With iOS 13, native support of USB external storage was introduced to iPhones. Files stored externally can be accessed from the Files app included in the OS. Other apps can do it as well if it can connect to this Files app. Sadly, modern iPhones' external port of choice is Lightning, which means you either buy a storage device with a Lightning port or get an adapter to connect a USB device. This is where things get complicated.

I bought a Lexar MicroSD to Lightning Reader (part # LRWMLBNL) more than three years ago. It connects directly to the Lightning port and I can open files using a dedicated app. Apple MFI certified storage can supposedly work with the iOS 13's Files app, but that wasn't the case here despite the certification. Adding insult to injury, its app had not been updated in more than two years - the screen resolution and the file sharing functions were outdated. I needed a different solution.

Apple sells many types of USB adapters, one of which is the Lightning to USB Camera Adapter you see above (US$29). It can be connected to a camera for transferring photos and videos, hence the name. Other devices could be plugged in as long as the OS recognizes it, like keyboard, MIDI equipment, or Ethernet adapter. iOS 13 expands this to general storage and mouse.

Plugging in a USB flash drive directly do the adapter results in a "Cannot Use Accessory: This accessory requires too much power" error

So I bought this adapter expecting that any low-power storage devices like USB flash drives and memory card reader could be plugged in directly for my file management uses. Boy was I so wrong. Of the multitudes of flash drives and card readers I own, all of them, save for one, caused the "too much power" error you see here. This was bizarre because they shouldn't consume enough power for this to appear. There had to be a reason and a way around this, so I decided to dig in.
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Experiencing the 2019 Daegu EV Eco Rally

Starting gate and the ceremonial stage of the 2019 Daegu EV Eco Rally

Daegu Metropolitan City is currently the most proactive regional government in the mainland Korea for promoting the adoption of electric vehicles. The city has its own sprawling charger network and the total number of EVs eligible for purchase subsidy per year is one of the largest in the nation. Also, it has been holding an EV Eco Rally since 2017 to show off the clean and efficient nature of the EVs to its citizens.

I wanted to know how efficient I was driving my car, so I attended the event last year despite being just four months into EV ownership at the time and needing a two and a half hour trip from Naju. I ended up ranking roughly in the middle. Feeling that I could do better, I honed my skills and re-entered the competition this year.

My daughter Celine rode with me on my Bolt EV, and the car was assigned to Group D, number 42

Since each car models have different characteristics, participating cars were grouped according to the model. A group needed at least four cars for efficiency ranking and four models qualified this year - Kona (Group A) and Niro (Group B) had 14 cars while Ioniq (Group C) and Bolt EV (Group D) had 9. Other models participated on a non-competitive basis, which brought the overall total to 56 cars.

To drive as efficiently as possible in the rally, convenience features like air conditioning and satellite navigation screen are turned off to save energy. This makes the ride quite uncomfortable as my family found out last year. But Celine still wanted to join her dad in the event for this year, so I assigned her the duty of a human navigator, helping me make my way around the busy Daegu downtown. I didn’t realize how significant this would affect the outcome at first.
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Assessing one full year of Bolt EV driving

My Bolt EV has travelled 24,099.4km in its first year

On June 1, 2019, my Bolt EV had its first birthday. As it moved around more than 24,000 kilometers, I kept a detailed log to make continuous analysis of the car's conditions and characteristics. Many people including myself are interested in how an electric vehicle fares over the years, so this should provide some good insights.

Bolt EV's monthly statistics from June 2018 to May 2019 - distance, fuel economy, and battery capacity

I used to drive around 1,000km per month on average before getting a Bolt EV. But you can see that it has doubled since. Cheaper fuel costs was a major factor (less than 1/10 that of gasoline), with some "new car curiosity" thrown in. Efficiency suffered in summer and winter due to the extreme temperatures, which affects battery performance and climate control use. Largely speaking though, fuel economy had been improving because I've been adjusting my driving style to be smoother in order to go further before recharging. This proved to be helpful in long-distance trips.

The three lines at the bottom of the graph depict the battery capacity as calculated by various means. The battery degradation is a major concern for many, so I kept track of this closely as well. Going by the reported values, my Bolt EV originally had 58.63kWh of usable capacity (65.14kWh raw) and had 55.98kWh usable (62.20kWh raw) by 24,099.4km. This is a degradation of 4.52%. Assuming linear progression, the battery would have exactly 70.0% of capacity left after 160,000km. This is in line with the industrial average warranty and shows that my Bolt EV's battery is in a reasonably good condition so far.

So why did I have three lines here? It stems from the fact that the Bolt EV doesn't tell you its battery health outright. One of the Parameter ID (PID) readings from the OBD-II port (#2241A3) correlates directly with battery capacity, but interpreting the number has been up for debate. So I decided to find an interpretation that I was comfortable with.
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Bolt EV under ideal charging conditions

Korea's Ministry of Environment (ME) has been aggressively expanding its network of DC Fast Charging (DCFC) stations throughout the country, with more than 1,100 new chargers being installed and operating in pilot mode since early this year, accounting for nearly 40% of total. I was fortunate enough to live close to one of such stations (and a 100kW version at that), which let me test out the charging characteristics of my Bolt EV without costing me a dime.

Although the chargers are supposed to switch to normal paid operation starting mid-May as the firmware updates are deployed in a staggered manner, I was able to observe what the close-to-ideal charging situation would be before this happened to the nearby charger. The following graphs plot the data I recorded.

It should be noted that the ME chargers have either a 40-minute or a 41-minute time-out. This was done to prevent a single person from hogging the charger for too long. Therefore, I did these charging sessions during the early hours in the morning when no one else was around in order to have as close to continuous charging as possible. This led to a bit of "blips" in the graph (64% - 41st minute / 88% - 82nd minute), but it did not affect the overall picture that much.

Bolt EV's charging curve on a 100kW station as a function of Displayed SoC

Charging speed is largely dependent on the battery's State of Charge (SoC), so it helps to see the data as its function. As you can see, the charging current remains more or less constant at a given "zone", then drops down a step after a certain level of SoC is reached.

The actual charging power will slowly increase in a zone because the charging voltage rises. This is a direct reflection of the the voltage of the battery cells themselves, which rise as the energy is filled up. The 288 cells are arranged as 96 groups in series of 3 cells in parallel, so there would be nearly a 100-fold difference between the cell voltage and the charging voltage.

Another major factor in the speed is the battery's temperature. Assessing multiple charging sessions, it became apparent that it should be around 24 to 27°C at the beginning in order for the Bolt EV to enter maximum current (roughly 150A before 50%). If it's colder, it will start out a bit slower, then ramp up to 150A as the battery heats up to about 24°C. If it's too hot (more than 30°C), the charging current caps to 95A to prevent overheating.

Bolt EV's charging curve on a 100kW station as a function of time

For someone who's waiting for the car to fill up, the time it takes for each of those charging zones is also quite important. So this is a graph showing the same data, but plotted as a function of time. Key numbers are distilled into the following table.

To make a quick comment about the displayed and actual SoC, the two meet at around 75% mark, with the displayed getting larger above and the actual getting larger below. At the extremes the two differ by about 4%, showing the buffer for preventing over-charging or over-discharging.

SoC Range (%) Duration (mm:ss) Speed (%/min) Power (kW) Current (A)
10 ~ 50 28:30 1.40 53 149
50 ~ 67 16:00 1.06 39 107
67 ~ 83 24:00 0.67 25 66
83 ~ 92 20:00 0.45 18 46
92 ~ 98 17:00 0.35 11 29
98 ~ 100 08:30 0.24 6 ~ 10 17 ~ 28
The power and current values are as seen from the charger. The values from the vehicle's subsystem were about 96% of these, showing the losses inherent in the charging process. Further losses occur as the energy ends up inside the battery, so we end up with a bit more than 10% loss in total.

The advantage of using a 100kW (500V x 200A) charger is apparent only for the first 50% of charge, and is not a huge one at that. 50kW chargers in Korea supply either 110A or 120A maximum current, so the charging speed of 1.06%/minute should extend to below 50% SoC when you use them. Hence, you'll shave about 10 minutes off the session with a 100kW charger instead of a 50kW one if you're starting from 10% charge left. You can thank Bolt EV's highly conservative charging regime for this.

So what's the takeaway from all these information? Probably a good basis for forming a charging strategy during a long-distance trip. To minimize charging times, you should keep the car's SoC between 10 to 20% minimum and 70% to 80% maximum, with each charging session lasting about an hour at most. The last 25% alone takes an hour to charge, so a full charge is not a good strategy unless you're going to a place where the chargers are sparse. Meanwhile, the ambient temperature during charging should be as close to 20°C as possible. Hopefully, you can find a charger within a building or under a shade.
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The two satellites

Night sky is home to various satellites, both natural and artificial. I've taken photos of these objects in the past few days and here are a couple them for you to enjoy.
Iridium 97 streaks downward in the northern sky on February 17, 2019

The Iridium satellites are known for their flares caused by the interesting shape of their antennae. I had a chance to observe Iridium 97 moving down the northern sky with my iPhone XS. While the satellite shined noticeably for about twenty seconds, this merging of a 1-minute, 610-photo session reveals that it was still dimly visible for some time before and after that. The rest of the satellite reflects the sunlight, just not as effectively.

Device: iPhone XS
Settings: 26mm - ISO 2500 - 1/15s - f/1.8
Filters: None
Time: 2019-02-17 19:04:46-19:05:46 KST
Location: Naju, Korea
610 photos merged with Startrails 2.3

The Super Moon as the first Full Moon of the Year of the Pig on February 20, 2019

This lunar year's first Full Moon (Jeongwol Daeboreum) was coincidentally a Super Moon. A bigger one would not appear until December 24, 2026. I took this photo just moments after the phase reached its peak, with a visible size of 34' 02.37" and a distance of 350,840km. As a result, it appears nearly 4,000 pixels wide (3,955 pixels, 0.516"/pixel). Unless I keep using the P1000 seven years later, this would be the largest photo of the Moon this camera would ever take.

Device: Nikon P1000
Settings: 3000mm - ISO 100 - 1/400s - f/8
Filters: None
Time: 2019-02-20 01:11:49, 01:14:07 KST
Location: Naju, Korea
2 photos merged with Pixelmator 3.8.1

Copyright (C) 1996-2018 Wesley Woo-Duk Hwang-Chung. All rights reserved.