Entries tagged as satellite

Today’s “The Toon-Box”

The two satellites

Night sky is home to various satellites, both natural and artificial. I've taken photos of these objects in the past few days and here are a couple them for you to enjoy.
Iridium 97 streaks downward in the northern sky on February 17, 2019

The Iridium satellites are known for their flares caused by the interesting shape of their antennae. I had a chance to observe Iridium 97 moving down the northern sky with my iPhone XS. While the satellite shined noticeably for about twenty seconds, this merging of a 1-minute, 610-photo session reveals that it was still dimly visible for some time before and after that. The rest of the satellite reflects the sunlight, just not as effectively.

Device: iPhone XS
Settings: 26mm - ISO 2500 - 1/15s - f/1.8
Filters: None
Time: 2019-02-17 19:04:46-19:05:46 KST
Location: Naju, Korea
610 photos merged with Startrails 2.3

The Super Moon as the first Full Moon of the Year of the Pig on February 20, 2019

This lunar year's first Full Moon (Jeongwol Daeboreum) was coincidentally a Super Moon. A bigger one would not appear until December 24, 2026. I took this photo just moments after the phase reached its peak, with a visible size of 34' 02.37" and a distance of 350,840km. As a result, it appears nearly 4,000 pixels wide (3,955 pixels, 0.516"/pixel). Unless I keep using the P1000 seven years later, this would be the largest photo of the Moon this camera would ever take.

Device: Nikon P1000
Settings: 3000mm - ISO 100 - 1/400s - f/8
Filters: None
Time: 2019-02-20 01:11:49, 01:14:07 KST
Location: Naju, Korea
2 photos merged with Pixelmator 3.8.1

Clearest view of ISS yet from Nikon P1000

International Space Station seen on the evening of February 11, 2019

Animation of the ISS overpass
Previous tracking of the ISS with Nikon P1000 was alright, but I felt that it could have been better. Another good tracking opportunity came up yesterday, so I got my equipment ready and had another shot at it. Suffice to say, the results were quite satisfactory. Many of the shots came out quite clearly, you could see the division of each section easily. I did not need to resort to stacking - only the brightness and the sharpness were adjusted here.

The Space Station came closest to the observer on 18:48:49 (third photo) at a distance of 428km. Altitude from the ground was 411km at the time. You can see that the shots before that had the Zvezda module (lowest point in the second photo at 18:48:19) pointing at the observer, while the shorts after that had the Kibo-Harmony-Columbus modules (lower part of the middle section in the fifth photo at 18:49:49) doing that. Another thing to note is that I was looking at the general direction of the Sun, which had just had set below the horizon, before the space station made the closest approach. As the solar panels are always facing the Sun, I would be looking at the back of them in the first and the second photos, which is why they aren't illuminated and visible there.

Device: Nikon P1000
Settings: 3000mm - ISO 100 - 1/400 to 1/640s - f/8
Filters: None
Time: 2019-02-11 18:48-18:50 KST
Location: Naju, Korea
Defined tags for this entry: , , , ,

Nikon P1000 catches the ISS transiting the Moon

ISS transits the Moon on January 22, 2019 (18% size)

Orbital prediction indicated that the ISS would be seen passing in front of the Full Moon at a place about 20km away from home. Thanks to the Moon being at an altitude of more than 60 degrees, the space station was to pass close to the observer with an angular size of nearly one degree (58.7"). It seemed be a good opportunity for using the 7-frame full resolution burst mode of the Nikon P1000 camera, so I drove to the observation spot despite the cold weather (-4°C) and inconvenient time (3 AM).

Crops of the ISS passing in front of the Moon

There was about one second of difference in the transit time prediction between different tools, and the burst mode could only take the seven photos in a span of a single second. So I took a guess as to when to press the shutter button and hoped for the best. Luckily, I did manage to catch three frames out of it, as you can see here. The results were sharp and large enough to make out the individual solar panels and modules, proving the capabilities of the P1000's telephoto optics.

Device: Nikon P1000
Settings: 3000mm - ISO 200 - 1/1600s - f/8
Filters: None
Time: 2019-01-22 03:08:23 KST
Location: Yeongam, Korea
Defined tags for this entry: , , , , ,

Nikon P1000 observes ISS-Sun transit

Nikon CoolPix P1000 observes the Sun next to Celestron NexStar 6SE telescope

Encouraged with the results from the previous observation, I took the Nikon P1000 outside during the day to take the photos of the ISS crossing in front of the Sun. Last time I was able to see the transit at home was three and a half years ago. I also got my Celestron telescope out as a backup in case any one of the equipment failed to record the phenomenon. The camera needed a solar filter like the telescope, so I bought an ND100000 glass filter online for US$40 that provided the same amount of light reduction.

Full-resolution composite of the ISS passing in front of the Sun on November 3, 2018 (click for the full photo)

Although the P1000 has burst mode, it can only take seven photos in a span of a second. The window of opportunity was too narrow, so instead of taking the risk I used the 4K 30fps video capability instead. It would sacrifice image quality, but I was sure to get the shot if the frame and focus were right. And sure enough, the transit was captured successfully as you see above.

Stacked image of the ISS shows the details

The result may not be not quite as sharp as using a telescope, but much of the features of the space station were distinguishable. Perhaps I should try the burst mode the next time I get the opportunity to see if that makes a difference.

Device: Nikon P1000
Settings: 3000mm - ISO 400 - 1/500s - f/8
Filters: ICE N100000 (Neutral Density 16.5 Stop)
Time: 2018-11-03 10:48:02 KST
Location: Naju, Korea
17 photos processed with Pixelmator and RegiStax 6.1.0.8

Copyright (C) 1996-2018 Wesley Woo-Duk Hwang-Chung. All rights reserved.