Server upgraded to macOS Big Sur

iMac stuck on Setting Up Account step of the macOS Big Sur upgrade

I skipped upgrading the iMac serverโ€™s OS to macOS 10.15 Catalina last year mainly due to the removal of 32-bit application support. After a year, the clean-up of obsolete apps was complete, paving the way for the upgrade.

During the preparation, there was a bit of a hiccup with the MySQL database, But putting the data to a new one largely solved the issue and the website ended up loading much quicker. Two minor errors occurred after moving to the new database, which were quickly resolved by editing the configuration file:

1. "Query failed: Out of sort memory, consider increasing server sort buffer size"

Solution: increase sort_buffer_size from the default of 262144
sort_buffer_size=2097152

2. "Query failed: Expression #1 of SELECT list is not in GROUP BY clause and contains nonaggregated column 'blog.multilingual_body.value' which is not functionally dependent on columns in GROUP BY clause; this is incompatible with sql_mode=only_full_group_by"

Solution: remove only_full_group_by in sql_mode
sql_mode=STRICT_TRANS_TABLES, NO_ZERO_IN_DATE, NO_ZERO_DATE, ERROR_FOR_DIVISION_BY_ZERO, NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION

With all the pieces ready I went with the installation of macOS 11.0 Big Sur. It took about an hour and except for a prolonged setup time of the iCloud, things went smoothly.

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Adventures in fixing broken Korean text in MySQL DB

The Tool-Box.info website has been running on the Apache - PHP - MySQL (APM) solution for the past 13 years. Each component has been constantly upgraded over the years, and recently I decided to update MySQL from 5.7 to 8.0. Once I managed to migrate the database to the new version, I discovered that all the Korean texts on the website came out broken. This was a sign of mismatched character set, so I looked for the exact cause.

First, I rolled back to 5.7 and checked what character sets were being used, using the following SQL query:
show variables like 'char%';

Sure enough, "character_set_database" and "character_set_server" were set to "latin1". Upon checking the database and the tables that contain the website data, their character sets were all set to "latin1_swedish_ci", the default choice. All the Korean texts were being saved to the database in Latin1 format from the very beginning. It got converted into UTF-8 as it was passed to the output, so it looked normal when viewed through a web page. But if you looked directly into the database, it came out broken. MySQL 8.0 apparently decided to output the text in its saved form, unlike 5.7, hence the problem.

The solution proposed by many of the Korean blogs that had a similar problem was to alter the character set of the affected databases and tables in the following manner:
ALTER DATABASE data_database CHARACTER SET = utf8mb4 COLLATE = utf8mb4_unicode_ci;

ALTER TABLE data_table DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8mb4;

ALTER TABLE data_table MODIFY COLUMN title VARCHAR(255) CHARACTER SET utf8mb4 COLLATE utf8mb4_general_ci;

And also, add the following lines under [mysqld] in the MySQL configuration file (my.cnf):
collation-server = utf8_unicode_ci
character-set-server = utf8

Sadly, all this did not help one bit. Upon further analysis, I arrived at the conclusion that the underlying data was still in "broken" form even if the settings had the character set changed. The data itself has to be rewritten in UTF-8, so I needed to dump the database and reload it in the correct character set. First, the dump:
mysqldump -u root -p --default-character-set=latin1 data_database > dump.sql

The "default-character-set" flag was set to "latin1" to ensure that the data is dumped in its originally saved character set. In the dumped file, I changed all the "latin1" strings into "utf8mb4".

Now I simply had to restore it back, but the "Specified key was too long; max key length is 1000 bytes" error prevented me from restoring some of the tables. I tracked the problem down to the limitation of the MyISAM database type. Because the "VARCHAR" data type for a column needs 3 times more space for UTF-8 than Latin1, the character set change caused the key length to exceed the 1000-byte limit. With InnoDB database type, it was 3072 bytes by default since MySQL 5.7.7.

Because of this, I changed the database type mentioned in the file from MyISAM to InnoDB. So why was it set to MyISAM in the first place? It was because Full-text index was not available for InnoDB at the time of the database creation. It was enabled in 2011 with MySQL 5.6.

With both the database type and character set changed in the dump file, I restored the database like this:
mysql -u root -p --default-character-set=utf8mb4 data_database < dump.sql

I could now see that all the Korean text appeared correctly in the database. It would also look right on the website if I kept the changes to the my.cnf file mentioned earlier. Finally, I migrated the database to MySQL 8.0 again, and ran the "mysql_upgrade" command. Everything was working as intended, and I no longer needed the changes to the my.cnf, so those were removed.

Long story short, initial database settings from 13 years ago almost held me back from upgrading to the newest MySQL version, but all of them are now fixed.
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Server now on iMac and macOS High Sierra

New iMac 21.5" 2017, freshly booted and ready to replace Mac mini 2012

The venerable Mac mini 2012, which took over the job of the server from the iMac 2008 in February 2013, showed signs of its age two months ago, refusing to boot due to corrupted Fusion Drive. I was able to remedy the problem, but I thought it may be a good time to move over to a new system. Seeing that Apple has not updated Mac mini in three years (and frankly, the 2014 edition was not an upgrade many had hoped for) I decided to return to using an iMac.

The iMac 21.5" 2017 was able to smoothly take over the Mac mini last month, but for some reason the system came equipped with macOS Sierra (10.12) instead of High Sierra (10.13) which was already a month old at the time. So I applied an extra caution and checked carefully that the apps I ran were compatible before manually upgrading. Finally, I made the switch to High Sierra today. It seems everything is functioning as expected.
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Server upgraded to macOS Sierra

With major tasks at the workplace wrapped up, I decided that the National Foundation Day holiday would be a good time to upgrade the Mac mini server from El Capitan (OS X 10.11) to Sierra (OS X macOS 10.12). For a warm-up, I upgraded the MySQL Server installation from 5.6 to 5.7 before that, but I ran into some weird issues and took about an hour to resolve. After getting MySQL to work again, I made a full system backup and installed Sierra. With the new OS in place, I restored the server configuration and now you see that the website is back in action. iPhone 7 review will resume shortly.
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The slow updating of Google's Mobile Usability Report

Pages with mobile usability issues as Google sees it, as of May 14, 2016

It's been more than a month since I revamped the site to be mobile friendly. Yet it takes quite a bit of time for Google to re-crawl all those pages and realize that they're have been changes. As you can see here, Google Mobile Usability Report still thinks roughly 15% of the indexed pages still aren't mobile friendly despite the fact that the template update affected the entire site at once. These pages would still show up in the search results without the "Mobile Friendly" tag and be ranked lower. I guess I'll have to wait a few more weeks.
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